The Alzheimer's Australia NSW blog *Younger Onset Dementia and ME*

*The Alzheimer's Australia NSW blog *Younger Onset Dementia and ME* is a place for people to connect with others, to get information and helpful suggestions.

A diagnosis of younger onset dementia can be very isolating. You may have received a diagnosis, be someone who is caring for a family member, or you may have a mum or dad with younger onset dementia. You are not alone. The National Younger Onset Dementia Key Worker Program provides individualised information and support to improve the quality of life for people with younger onset dementia and also see NSW - Younger Onset Dementia . For more information contact the National Dementia Helpline on 1800 100 500.

Wednesday, 13 July 2016

to help understand Primary progressive aphasia read or watch ...


if you would like to reserve a copy and you are a library member  - please email the Library nsw.library@alzheimers.org.au
 

read

Where the Light Gets in : Losing My Mother Only to Find Her Again

Many know Kimberly Williams-Paisley as the bride in the popular Steve Martin remakes of the "Father of the Bride" movies, the calculating Peggy Kenter on "Nashville," or the wife of country music artist, Brad Paisley. But behind the scenes, Kim’s mother, Linda, was diagnosed with a rare form of dementia that slowly took away her ability to talk, write and eventually recognize people in her own family. "Where the Light Gets In" tells the full story of Linda s illness called primary progressive aphasia from her early-onset diagnosis at the age of 62 through the present day. Kim draws a candid picture of the ways her family reacted for better and worse, and how she, her father and two siblings educated themselves, tried to let go of shame and secrecy, made mistakes, and found unexpected humour and grace. Ultimately the bonds of family were strengthened, and Kim learned ways to love and accept the woman her mother became. With a moving foreword by actor and advocate Michael J. Fox, "Where the Light Gets In" is a heart warming tribute to the often fragile yet unbreakable relationships we have with our mothers."

watch
Looks Like Laury Sounds Like Laury,
 

 By Pamela Hogan & Connie Shulman

What would you do if you started to disappear? At the age of 45, our friend Laury Sacks, an ebullient actress and the doting mother of two small children, had a reputation as the quickest wit in the room. At the age of 46, she began forgetting words. Soon she could barely speak.

Our film, Looks Like Laury Sounds Like Laury, captures one year in the long, but short journey of frontotemporal dementia, a little-understood disease that strikes people in the prime of life.
But back to Laury. She lived on the Upper Westside in Manhattan with her husband, Eric, and their two young children. She had been an actress/writer for many years prior to having kids, and then devoted her time to being a mom and writing a memoir about her unconventional childhood. But a memoir requires memories, and when gregarious Laury suddenly became quiet, she began to have difficulty accessing hers.

*The changes were subtle at first. She asked Pam to meet for coffee one day, but it was surprisingly difficult to engage her in conversation. To the question “What’s going on, am I boring you?” she answered prophetically, “No! I’m just in my head. ” Then she offered a reassuring hug – which wasn’t reassuring at all.

*Everyone misread the cues: “We’re not as close as we used to be;” “She must be mad at me;” “Maybe she’s depressed.” As Laury’s friend Nelsie said, “I don’t think it ever occurred to us she couldn’t access language, that she was trapped in her brain and couldn’t access it.”

*But Laury was an actress, and she was acting the hell out of her new part – a woman disappearing.
The film came about when Connie suggested making a film to capture her mysterious new life – and Laury jumped at the idea. It is the profoundly personal portrait of a woman who is facing the unthinkable. As she says straight to camera the first day of filming: “What do I hope for? I hope for – the truth!”

*Following Laury through her day to day life over the course of a year, conversations begin to resemble the famous Abbott and Costello comedy sketch “Who’s on First?” as Laury gives rapid-fire “Yes!” “No!” “No-Yes!” answers, and confusion reigns.

*Her husband Eric senses that not only does she grasp the absurdity of the situation, but “at some level she thinks its funny.”
 

to view clips -
https://vimeo.com/othernoises/lauryclipdifferent

https://vimeo.com/75877681